Saturday, September 26, 2009

Thai Glass Noodle Salad

This is a cool and refreshing noodle salad. Especially popular in the north of Thailand.

Ingredients:
1/2 packet glass noodles
1 bunch coriander chopped
1 bunch mint leaves chopped
1 bunch spring onion chopped
1/2 red onion finely sliced
1 tbs sesame seeds
1 green lime - juice
4 tbs fish sauce
1 tbs sugar
pinch of salt
1 tbs vegetable oil
1 tsp dark soya sauce
1 green chilli finely sliced- remove seeds

1. Boil water in a saucepan. Remove from heat and soak noodles. When noodles are softened, put in a colander to drain hot water away and wash with cold water. Use scissors to cut noodles so its easier to handle.
2. Mix in a salad bowl with the other ingredients.
3. Refrigerate for an hour before serving.

16 comments:

Jennie said...

While we're on the subject of northern Thailand - you haven't perhaps heard of recipe using rice as a spice? I believe you fry the uncooked rice in oil before grinding it and sprinkling it on spicy ground beef. saw it on a cooking show once, but can't find it anywhere on the internet!

Khawaga said...

Is this what you gave us on Saturday, Paula? But you added prawns. I'm taking this for Lina's class party at school tonight!

Talented Foreigner said...

Oh yes, I forgot the prawns! This is what I made on Saturday- its really simple because its essentially a salad. The recipe also calls for boiled minced pork (about 3 tablespoons) which I omitted because some of us dont eat meat.
The combination of mint and coriander is what makes this dish taste so good. And you must use lime, not lemon! A trip to the Asian shop is essential here.

Talented Foreigner said...

Actually no, I havent heard of using rice as a spice. I think the modern Asian fusion food has replaced it with sesame seeds to sprinkle on beef.I have to find out more about this. The only thing I have found out about rice these days is that I can soak it overnight and mush it up into a batter to make Indian dosai! (Indian savoury pancakes).

Khawaga said...

I've come across this Jennie, in a book saying it is used in northern Thai cooking. Says: 'ground roasted rice is rice wh has been dry fried in a wok w galangal until golden brown, then ground to a fine powder and used in many Isan and Northern regional dishes'. I have used it, tho it was pretty weird. This was in Khamtane Signavong, Lemongrass and sweet basil.

Khawaga said...

Paula, What about a recipe for laksa? I keep on trying to make this and it doesn't really work.

Talented Foreigner said...

laksa isnt really my speciality (for some reason, I didnt take to it in Singapore), but I have been meaning to make mee siam. have you heard of it? - its similar to laksa.

Jennie said...

Khawaga - that's it! Sounds exactly right. How so weird, I wonder? Did it taste of anything?

Khawaga said...

All I really want is savoury yummy noodle soup with bits of chicken or maybe prawn or piggy, and probably bit of green vegetables also. Is there something that would meet that description?

PS Made the glass noodle salad with marinated beef on and took it to, of all unlikely places, Lina's class party at school. It was finished! I sat next to a mother who said twice how nice it was, not knowing it was MINE ha ha. I smirked silently and felt happy.

Talented Foreigner said...

hmm- you can do a noodle soup like what i recently posted. but thats chinese and much more mild than laksa. im certain you will love mee siam because it tastes exactly like laksa- it has a chilli and belachan (shrimp paste) base which is mixed with coconut milk. I will try to make it over the next few weeks and post it up here on the blog.

Khawaga said...

Jennie, it tasted a bit like burnt cumin. It's hard to describe. Rather burnt. Try it! The final mixture was very good though. I can send you the recipe it was in if you promise to tell everyone I am the best blogger there is .. ha ha.

Khawaga said...

By the way should this be palm sugar, or normal sugar? I did use palm sugar, but I'm not sure it worked.

Talented Foreigner said...

This has to be normal sugar. It is difficult to mix up palm sugar into the salad as it breaks up into little bits all over the dish. Unless you make the dressing seperately and you mix in the palm sugar thoroughly with a metal spoon. I find palm sugar works very well in heated dishes like curries and pad thai because it melts and caramelizes beautifully. But for the salads, I find white sugar works best because of its fine grainy texture.

Jennie said...

@Khawaga: do send it! *crossing fingers behind back* :-)

Khawaga said...

Okay, okay! Here it is. It's similar to Paula's beef salad (which the second class-party got, also popular).

Crying Tiger.

300 g good piece of beef, left whole
2 tsp soy
1 tsp oyster sauce
1 tsp chilli powder
1 tsp ground white pepper
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp finely chopped garlic

Make up those into a marinade and marinate the beef in it in one piece.

Then grill the beef, then slice it. Put on a salad of lettuce, cucumber, chilli, coriander, mint (you could just use Paula's recipe here). And serve with the following:

Isan Chilli Sauce:

- for 100 ml,
2 tsp chilli powder
2 tsp ground roasted rice (as above)
1/2 tsp sugar
2 tbsp lime juice
1 tbsp fish sauce
2 tbs light soy
1 tsp chopped shallots
1 tsp chopped coriander

Mix all except the last two, then sprinkle those on and serve with the beef.

Book says this sauce is also v popular with barbecued pork, chicken or fish.

Jennie said...

Excellent Khawaga! Thanks for that. Looks just like what I saw in the cooking program. Think it was Madhur Jaffrey if I remember correctly. Will give this a go!

Paula - thanks for lending us your comment page as a recipe forum ;-)